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The Evil Editor: an interview

And today we interview nothing less than Evil Editor, the world’s most famous editor!

1) Why anonymity? Are you afraid one day some exasperated writer will come and get you?

For starters, if you spend 4 hours a day blogging, you don’t want such
people as co-workers and bosses knowing it.

More importantly, if Evil Editor were to reveal his identity, his thousands
of minions would immediately Google his name. They would discover either
that:

a. I am an editor for X, in which case I would be deluged with
manuscripts from people who have been loyal followers of my blog for years
and even contributed to it and feel the least I can do in return is read
and edit their full manuscripts, offer career advice and publish their
trunk novels.
b. Or that I am not an editor, but a sandwich maker at Subway, in which
case word would get out and no one would ever again send their queries and
openings to the blog because who wants writing advice from the guy who
makes their meatball sub? And I would have to quit blogging as Evil Editor
and start blogging as Unsanitary Sandwich Maker.

Also, I’m afraid one day some exasperated writer will come and get me.

2) Why using the ‘Evil Editor’as a nom de plume? Are you really a bastard or are you just showing off?

Most authors submit to Evil Editor seeking constructive criticism. A few
submit seeking undiluted praise, and when they instead get constructive
criticism hidden beneath sarcasm and eye rolling they take out their
frustration on Evil Editor. Some people go so far as to call me a bastard,
even though they’ve never even met me. This is where the Evil Editor
moniker comes in handy, as my loyal minions invariably will post comments
saying, “Hey wankcheese, it’s called *Evil* Editor, not *Kind* Editor. If
you want praise, show your query to your mum.” [Note my attempt to
ingratiate myself with a British audience by using terms like “mum” and
“wankcheese.”]

3) How did you become an editor and did you decide to become one?

I started out as a math major, but eventually realized that the only math
that’s useful in life is the math you learn in elementary school. So I
switched to English, but I could barely understand what anyone in
Shakespeare’s plays and Chaucer’s tales was talking about. I blamed this
not on the authors, but on lazy editors who let gibberish slip by, and
vowed that if *I* ever became an editor, none of *my* authors would look
illiterate. That doesn’t exactly answer the question, but the question
doesn’t exactly make sense.

4) Tell us about the first book you’ve ever read.

Let’s see, as I recall it had a boy named Ted and a girl named Sally. They
had a dog named Boots and a cat named Tuffy. The writing was rather
simplistic, I thought: no complex sentence structure, no similes, no
onomatopoeia. Not that any of us complained. We just wanted to get our
Kindergarten diplomas and get out.

5)Who’s your favourite writer ever? (come one, I’m sure you like someone …)

Having read all 47 Nero Wolfe mystery books twice, I’ll have to say Rex
Stout, but if you mean whose writing makes me say Wow, it’s Michael Chabon.

6) What is the best side of your job, what’s the worse one? (and please don’t state it’s this interview)

The best part of being Evil Editor is that I always get the last word if I
want it, and people think I know what I’m talking about. Whereas in real
life I never get the last word and people think I’m an idiot.

The worst part is when the lunch cart guy has already sold all the cheese
danishes when he gets to my office.

If you want to know more about the Evil Editor, simply visit his website: evileditor.blogspot.co.uk/



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